James Ward Byrkit

Coherence

Coherence

When people use the word "horror", it can mean a number of things. Generally, it's used as a genre label, to be the cover-all term for fiction that is deemed scary. Sometimes, people use it to denote something truly horrifying, scarier on a level that goes deeper than jumping out of your seat because something surprised you. Coherence falls into the second category for me, which might be an odd statement considering nowhere is this film described as a horror film. Yet it's only one of a few films in recent memory to really, genuinely make me feel scared both during the movie, and for hours afterwards. Paranoia, anxiety, fear, and uncertainty all coursed through my veins during my viewing, and even as the credits rolled, the feelings still lingered. Rather than fear of any sort of entity or bad guy, it's a deeper, existential dread that the movie sets up, asking the kinds of questions that only good sci-fi can.